CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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Examples of bossism include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today’s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand. Capital, Coercion, and Crime. Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific.

The predatory nature of the Philippine state, according to Sidel, has its roots in American colonial efforts at nation-building in the early twentieth century. More in Politics—Comparative and International Politics. Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development. Sidel has written a superb and pioneering analysis that defines the future course for studies of local elites–not only in the Philippines but elsewhere as well.

Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines

Details and ordering information at Stanford University Press. This dependency, in turn, ensures that the Philippines will never rise above this post-colonial mire for as long as bossism remains entrenched.

However, there are people who actually vote freely for bosses in the Philippines, no matter how transparently corrupt they are. Describe the connection issue. The small-town dynasties of Cebu– 5.

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These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries. The book philip;ines these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. Everyday Politics in the Philippines: Poverty and insecurity leave many voters vulnerable to clientelist, coercive, and financial pressure, and the state’s central role in capital accumulation provides the basis for local bosses’ economic empires and political machines.

However, with the demise of parliamentary rule and the onset of martial law inand the inception of military rule ina centralized bureaucratic state emerged to subordinate local aristocracies, magnates, and gangsters alike [ Local bossism flourished in Burma during the early postindependence period of parliamentary rule, but faded at least in Burma proper with the imposition of centralized military rule in Bossism in the Philippines.

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ISBN Full text not tye from this repository. Knowing this, it becomes entirely conceivable that some bosses remain in power simply because they are legitimately re-elected. Hutchcroft, University of Wisconsin, Madison. However, Filipino voters, with their indigenous cultural constructs, remain the most important locus for change, as it is they who must evaluate and deconstruct this state apparatus in order to effectively contradict, destabilize, and subvert the institution of bossism.

Examples of bossism include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand. Account Options Sign in. Ateneo de Manila Philippiens Press, Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian From the Philippine examples, we see that even seemingly untouchable bosses will fall though sometimes only temporarily when they lose an election.

Capital, coercion, and crime : bossism in the Philippines in SearchWorks catalog

Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines. SearchWorks Catalog Stanford Libraries. Of course, whether or not any election is legitimate or truly democratic is debatable. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations.

Sidel is to be commended for this highly objective analysis of Philippine bossism, and an honest portrayal of the predation and violence that pervade the electoral system. Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and rhe importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth coercioon power in the Philippines.

For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism.

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The author argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration phillppines formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development. This brings us back to the problem of ignoring the cultural context philipines which political events take place. It builds on, while going significantly beyond, what other scholars have done and lays out a reasoned argument that future scholarship will have to engage about how public offices are won and lost and for whose benefit.

Help Center Find new research papers in: The DistrictLevel Dynasties of Cebu.

Kerkvliet Limited preview – Find it at other libraries via WorldCat Limited preview. Click here to sign up. The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development.

It is painfully obvious that bossism is highly damaging to Philippine society as a whole, at the ih least because it corrupts electoral politics and hobbles the development of a truly representative democracy. The comparative examples presented in the final chapter do not conclusively reinforce his assertions, nor do they show that an alternative institutional apparatus or sequence of political and economic developments would have prevented the emergence of bosses.

Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines – LSE Research Online

This essentially means that elected officials acquired broad discretionary powers over all local resources law enforcement, taxes, local appointments, etc. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Although an electoral democracy allows bossism to fester, it can also be its downfall. Physical description p. This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area’s coercive and economic resources.